Tag Archive for 'morning sickness'

Kim Kardashian Admits The Celebrity Pregnancy Is Not always As Easy As It Looks!

Kim Kardashian made her pregnant mom fans feel a little better the other day by admitting on the Red Carpet of her new movie, Temptation, that’s she’s just as human as the rest of us with a bout of pregnancy fatigue to contend with:

“Being pregnant is not as easy as my sister made it look or as my mom has made it look. I like to be active ….but I’ve been chilling out. I took a week off, just to rest and it was amazing.”

We’re glad that Kim is taking care of herself first as we know she keeps a busy schedule. Pregnancy is a good time to slow down and listen to your body. If you feel tired and run down, take some extra rest. Overall you may need to adjust your routine for less stress and more R&R. You deserve it and it’s good for the baby!

Kate Deals with Severe Morning Sickness

Although we would like to say congratulations are in order for the Duchess of Cambridge and her husband Prince William, it seems it may be a long 9 months of pregnancy for the royal couple with their recent announcement of Kate’s pregnancy along with severe morning sickness. Kate was said to be on the mend and “feeling better” Tuesday after her second day in a London hospital, according to the statement from St. James Palace.

Kate is believed to be only in her first trimester, possibly around 8 weeks pregnant, and this announcement is undoubtedly much sooner than they would like. However, the strong outpouring of support for the Duchess may be just what they need to deal with what could be a very challenging pregnancy ahead for Kate. Her condition, diagnosed as hyperemesis gravidarum, affects about 1 in 50 women who are expecting. The symptoms are severe vomiting that can last for the full duration of the pregnancy and may lead to dehydration if not treated. Kate is reportedly on an IV drip and taking pills to combat the nausea while she is on a “period of rest” at home.

Although severe morning sickness, as in Kate’s condition, can be serious for the mother and baby if the mother is very dehydrated (some people with this condition can vomit 30 times a day), if treated effectively with fluids and anti nausea medication, the majority of mothers go on to have healthy full term babies. There is even some studies showing that there are fewer miscarriages and preterm labor among women who have nausea and vomiting during pregnancy (although plenty of women experience no queasiness at all and go on to have delightful healthy pregnancies and babies).

Most studies do not explain why nausea in pregnancy can be sign of a healthy pregnancy although it is linked to higher levels of pregnancy hormones such as estrogen and hCG during pregnancy. There is also a slightly greater likelihood of twins with women with greater nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.

The Duke of Cambridge is “immensely grateful for the good wishes they have received” his spokesman said. No doubt Kate’s condition will raise awareness of extreme morning sickness during pregnancy.

William, 30, is second in line for the throne after his father, Prince Charles. William’s first child, whether it’s a boy or a girl, would be third in line to become the monarch under the new rules. This baby would be the first grandchild for Prince Charles and the third great grandchild for Queen Elizabeth.

We wish Kate all the best with the rest of her pregnancy and hopefully some relief as she is treated effectively by her doctors and receives plenty of TLC from friends, family and her many well-wishers.

Genetics May Play A Part In A Woman’s Chance For Nausea During Pregnancy

Researchers found that women were more likely to experience a serious form of morning sickness if their mothers or sisters did as well.

Looking specifically at a very severe form of nausea known as hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), the authors found that women with sisters who had HG were 17 times more likely to also develop HG. Women with this condition have unrelenting, excessive nausea and vomiting that puts them at risk of malnutrition, dehydration and significant weight loss.

Study author Dr. Marlena Fejzo of the University of Southern California-Los Angeles told Reuters Health she wasn’t surprised by the findings, since previous research has shown that severe morning sickness is more likely to affect both members of identical twin pairs, hinting at a heritable element.

However, in the new study, she added, “the degree of heredity is very exciting because it suggests genes are involved, and when we find those genes, we may finally understand the cause of severe nausea in pregnancy and be able to make new treatments that are designed to treat the cause rather than the symptoms.”

Most pregnant women – an estimated 75 percent – experience some morning sickness, according to the American Pregnancy Association, but 1 percent suffer the extreme HG form of illness that can require hospitalization.

It’s unclear why some women become nauseous while pregnant and others don’t. Even animals such as dogs and monkeys appear to experience a form of morning sickness, Fejzo noted. “There are even reports of snakes avoiding food during pregnancy,” she said in an e-mail.

To investigate whether severe forms of nausea might have genetic roots, Fejzo and her team reviewed information collected from 207 women who experienced HG during pregnancy and had at least one sister who had also been pregnant. They compared their responses to 110 of the patients’ female friends who had relatively nausea-free pregnancies, serving as controls.

The researchers found that 14 percent of women who experienced HG during pregnancy had sisters who also had HG, versus less than 1 percent of women who did not have HG.

When combining HG with other severe forms of morning sickness – persistent nausea that was not bad enough to require IV fluids or nutrition – a family history also appeared to put women at higher risk. Specifically, 34 percent of women with HG also had an affected sister, versus 8 percent of women who were never diagnosed with HG.

Among 469 women with HG and 216 of their female friends, 33 percent of those with HG had a mother with severe nausea or HG as well, versus only 8 percent of their friends.

“There can be variation in nausea and vomiting from one pregnancy to the next, which suggests that not only genes are involved but also other factors,” Fejzo noted. “For example, some studies suggest a female fetus or carrying multiple fetuses results in more nausea. So I would speculate that the level of nausea in pregnancy is a combination of both genetic factors and non-genetic factors.”

One concern about these findings, noted Dr. Andrej Grjibovski at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, who did not participate in the study, is that women with HG might have been more likely to volunteer to participate in the study if they had relatives who were also affected. And since these women recruited the controls themselves, they “may not be representative of the general population,” he cautioned.

Still, Grjibovski said in an e-mail that he was “not at all” surprised by the findings, since other research has suggested both maternal and paternal genes may play a role in HG. A recent analysis of more than 2 million birth records showed that women whose mothers suffered from a serious type of morning sickness were at triple the risk of the condition themselves.

HG hospitalizes more than 59,000 women every year in the U.S. A recent review of 27 large studies concluded that there is no reliable treatment for nausea in early pregnancy. Still, options include dietary changes (such as eating small meals and avoiding spicy foods), alternative therapies such as acupressure and hypnosis, and some prescription anti-nausea medications.

Fejzo said her team is currently planning a study to compare the genes of 1,000 women with HG to those of 1,000 of their unaffected friends. “With this approach, we should be able to identify the genetic variants that predispose to HG and then hopefully create new, more effective medications that are designed to correct the cause of the disease as opposed to the current medicines which are used to treat the symptoms.”

Source: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, online October 25, 2010.