Archive for the 'Breastfeeding' Category

TummyStyle’s 9th Anniversary!!

Happy April’s Fool Day! Today we celebrate TummyStyle’s 9th Anniversary! On this day 9 years ago, my daughter Audrey was 4 months old and she accompanied me in her car seat to the County Office in Auburn, California where we officially filed our business license for TummyStyle. Although the site was not alive for another 6 months, it was the inception day of our business.

I know April Fool’s Day is often a prankster and practical joke day, our business is not a joke and I view April Fool’s Day as a good omen of things to come. I also view it as the official start of Spring and of new birth, which is fitting for this website which is dedicated to new mothers and new birth.

Our mission from the beginning has been to support, inform, inspire and offer creative fashion pieces for expecting moms and new moms. As a nursing mother for each of my three children I understand how hard it can be to find fashionable nursing clothes that are both flattering and made to easily accommodate breastfeeding (without looking like it!). After not being able to find a nursing dress for my goddaughter’s baptism as I was also a new nursing mom to my own baby, I was inspired to start my own website where women could find fashionable nursing and maternity clothes without needing to leave their house. This idea soon expanded to encompass all aspects of maternity and nursing fashion including maternity swimwear and nursing pajamas and loungewear.

Through our blog which we have maintained for over 4 years, we aspire to inform moms of the latest research on pregnancy, breastfeeding, nutrition, exercise, parenting issues as well as indulge in fun topics on maternity fashion and celebrity pregnancy. We know our site can’t be all things to all people, so we focus on our niche and hope you enjoy your stop here and maybe find a cute fashion piece or two to add to your maternity wardrobe.

We thank all of our customers and supporters throughout the years who have visited our site and supported our business. We wish you health and happiness with your pregnancy, babies and life!

Breastfeeding Tips from Bravado!

Breastfeeding is the best nutrition and antibodies you can provide your baby during it’s first year of life and particularly for it’s first 6 months of life. According to a new Study published by Bravado! designs, our top nursing bra brand, breastfeeding is on the rise in North America.

In 2012 77% of new moms nursing their newborn, up 6% from 12 years ago in 2000 in the United States. In Canada breastfeeding rates also continued to rise with 89% of mothers breastfeeding their infants, up 4% from 2003. This is super news for both babies and new mothers as breastfeeding can improve the bond between mothers and their infants and even improve materal health and aid with postpartum weight loss.

Here is Bravado’s List of the Top 7 Benefits of Breastfeeding:

1) Breastmilk contains the right balance of nutrients for your baby.

2) Antibodies in Breast Milk boost your baby’s immune system.

3) Breastfeeding can protect your baby from developing allergies.

4) May lower baby’s risk of SIDS.

5) May protect your child from obesity.

6) May boost your child’s intelligence.

7) May reduce your stress level and risk for post-partum depression.

Although breastfeeding can seem a like perfectly natural thing to do, it may not always feel natural or be easy in the beginning. For many moms (and babies) it can take some time catching onto, breastfeeding every baby can be a different experience. Do not hesitate to get the help you need to get you and your baby on the right track with breastfeeding. Hospitals provide nurses and lactation consultants to guide you in feeding your baby. You can also to nursing support groups, La Leche Leagues and local Moms groups to seek out the help you need for breastfeeding.

Here are some Basic Breastfeeding Tips (as provided by Bravado!)

1) Ask for help right away

The first time you breast-feed your baby – preferably within a few hours after delivery, ask for help. The maternity nurses or a Lactation Consultant can offer breastfeeding tips, stating with how to position the baby on the breast and make sure he or she is latching on correctly.

2) Let your baby set the pace

For the first few weeks, most newborns feed every two to three hours around the clock. Watch for signs of hunger such as restlessness, sucking motions with lip movements.

3) Give it time

If breastfeeding is tougher than you expected, don’t get discouraged. Don’t let a rough start turn you off from breastfeeding. The more your breastfeed your baby, the more milk your breast will produce and the better you will get at it. But do  not hesitate to get the help you need if you do hit a rough patch (back to Step 1 when all else fails!) You will get there with time, patience and practice.

Breastfeeding is a job, but it is so worth it for your baby. It can be exhausting feeding your baby around the clock, so make sure you are getting the nutrition and support you need from friends, relatives, neighbors and anyone else who offers to cook you a meal, help with baby or household chores! Be sure to pat yourself on the back for doing a very good deed for your baby that will reap rewards for your both now and for years to come.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gisele Breastfeeding on the Job

elle-gisele-breastfeeding-hGisele Bundchen, as beautiful as ever, recently posted a photo on her Instagram account which takes multitasking to a new level. As seen in the photo she is getting her hair brushed by a stylist, getting her eyes done by a makeup artist and her nails painted by a manicurist (who happen to wear coordinating striped tops) all while simultaneously breastfeeding her baby.

My reactions to this scene is first, yes, how gorgeous (and calm!) she looks in the midst of this primping whirlwind craziness while she lovingly breastfeeds her child. Quelle entourage!!

Also, how good of her to prioritize her baby by unabashedly breastfeeding her child without lurking off to some hidden corner or caring what others thought of her openly breastfeeding. Life goes on and she’s back to work, but her baby isn’t going to take second place to her high end job demands.

My other reaction was, isn’t this the royal treatment we all could use as overworked moms, especially moms of babies and newborns? Heck I would still be breastfeeding my five year old if I had this sort attention and pampering!

Despite a little bit of envy (and wishing I looked half as good a few months or ever after having my babies), I have to take my hat off to Gisele for finding a way to prioritize her child and show that anytime is a good time to feed a baby and anyone who judges can simply leave the room. (I would also wager a bet that the continual primping and styling surrounding you as a supermodel can get a little wearisome after a while and may not feel like the spa indulgence that us normal moms may splurge on occasionally). However I would also wager a bet that most of us would trade our 9-5 jobs for this one if we could!

In a 2010 interview with Harper’s Bazaar UK edition Gisele raised eyebrows with her strong pro-breastfeeding stance stating that a worldwide law should require all mothers to breastfeed their babies for the first six months of life. She went on the say, “Are you going to give chemical food to your child when they are so little?”

Although I wholeheartedly support breastfeeding and agree that it is without a doubt the best thing you can do for your baby nutrition wise, particularly for the first six months of life, I also appreciate that it is sometimes extremely difficult for every mom to breastfeed fulltime given work and other demands. Certainly breastfeeding on the job may be easier in certain professions than others, but I do like the fact (as so glamorously demonstrated in Gisele’s photo documented example) we can all get creative and try to figure out a way to pull it off sometimes.

For example, pumping milk for a caregiver to feed your baby is a good option when nursing is not possible with your job or life demands. Many a professional mom has found that pumping (often while on a conference call) is the key to continuing breastfeeding when you need to be away from your baby by day. Even nighttime nursing alone is highly beneficial to your child and helps in your mother-baby bond if you are limited in the time you can spend with your child. Additionally, nighttime nursing also helps stimulate your milk supply more than pumping alone. In tandem, nighttime nursing and pumping for daytime feedings can often meet all of your baby’s feeding needs when you need to be at work or away from your baby during the day.

Gisele’s more tactful follow up comments in her personal blog are far more helpful and supportive of moms in general than her initial comments:
“I understand that everyone has their own experience and opinions and I am not here to judge,” she wrote. “I believe that bringing a life into this world is the single most important thing a person can undertake and it can also be the most challenging. I think as mothers we are all just trying our best.”

My thoughts exactly. We are all trying to do our best as moms day by day and as part of this parenting community we should support one another wholeheartedly in this endeavor.

Selfies of Uber-fit Moms who show off bodies after Birth are Selfish

Personally I am tired of these moms coming out of anonymity to show off post baby ultra-fit bodies by posting selfies on Facebook while scantily clad to put the rest of us normal people to shame. Really, is there not any decorum and decency left? Of course I say “good to you” if you can find the time, means and let’s not kid ourselves, genes, to drop all your baby weight in mere days after giving birth and reveal something like a set of six pack abs. But in my opinion these photos reveal more about vanity than muscles.

However it does give me pause to wonder if they are forgetting about the baby or were more focused on their own body weight than a healthy pregnancy. If you are nursing postpartum, which is a fulltime job in itself, you should be consuming an additional 500 calories a day for a total of approximately 2500 calories a day to support milk production.

Many nursing women find that over time nursing does help them burn off a lot of the baby weight while continuing to eat a healthy 2500 calorie a day diet, particularly as the baby gets older and eats more. Personally I think nursing fulltime should be redefined as something of a contact or endurance sport as it does take a high level of skill, patience, strategy, quick reaction time and limitless energy to get it right. Of course the long-term benefits to your baby and to your own health are infinite and priceless (and yes it does save you money). However, any sort of weight drop from nursing is usually gradual and generally does not kick in for several months as the early day and weeks postpartum are really about revving up your milk supply and learning how to feed your baby successfully (and around the clock while trying to steal catnaps whenever possible and feel vaguely human).

So my message to the exhibitionists who are looking for instant fame and recognition through a viral Instagram or u-tube videos for their abnormal postpartum weight loss is, please keep it to yourself or between you and your husband. We may gawk at your photo and send encouraging messages, but really you are shaming the rest of us normal people with actual human bodies that do not react like yours.

Redirect the focus to your postpartum health and that of our baby and less on vanity. These early days with your new baby are a precious bonding experience which can set the tone for your relationship with your child for life. Savor them, expect them to be heartwarming as well as challenging steeped in sleep deprivation. Be sure to rely upon the kindness of friends and family who offer to help and cook a meal or watch the baby while you take a break or rest.

Remember to give yourself a pat on the back for successfully bearing a child, managing your life and body through 9 months of pregnancy and having the guts to care for a newborn who does not always follow an instruction manual and seeking to make that new baby a priority in your life in the days, months and years to come. That’s the important stuff, six pack abs can wait.

Sucking Your Child’s Pacifier Is Not A Bad Thing!

Most parents have done this on the sly, but now you can do it openly, go ahead and suck that baby pacifier that fell to the ground before popping back into your baby’s mouth. Most feel guilty for not boiling the pacifer or trashing it. However, that parental instinct to just use your own spit is really the best thing you can do for your baby . A new study tells us that this practice will actually help reduce your baby’s chance of allergies later on.

“It’s really an interesting study, because it supports the theory of the hygiene hypothesis,” said Dr. Samuel Friedlander, an allergy specialist at University Hospital in Cleveland. “It’s a theory that state that our world is too clean. The immune system is like an army, and if the army doesn’t have anything to fight – like germs – it fights allergens.”

The study showed that toddlers were less likely to develop eczema and asthma if their parents were shared by their parent as the saliva on pacifiers appeared to help promote a bacterial diversity and stimulate the child’s immune system. In the same way, babies delivered vaginally benefitted from increased exposure to bacteria in the birth canal as newborns.

Of course there are times when this practice can be detrimental to a child’s health, such as when a parent is sick, has a virus or cold sores. However for the healthy parent it appears sharing a little saliva on a pacifier or utensil may be helpful to your child’s immune system.

Breastfeeding Can Extend Your Life (New Research!)

If you are wondering where to stand on the breastfeeding v. formula debate, some new research may make that decision a little clearer.

A mass study published that past Wednesday in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition discovered that exclusively breastfeeding your baby for at least six months could cut your chance of dying from cancer and all other diseases by 17%. This includes an 8% reduction in dying by heart disease alone.

Previous studies on breastfeeding have primarily looked at the affect on the baby or the short term health benefits to the mother, such as weight loss.

“No previous study has investigated the association between breastfeeding and mortality in the mother,” lead researcher Anne-Claire Vergnaud said. She added that “failure to breastfeed” related to an increase in premenopausal breast cancer, ovarian cancer and diabetes.

The study also confirmed previous findings on health benefits to the baby from breastfeeding including less likelihood of adult obesity or even being overweight, which reduces risk for seven different types of cancer as well as diabetes.

AICR Director of Research, Susan Higginbotham explains the connection between breastfeeding and longevity, “Physical changes in breast tissue that accompany milk production provide some protection as well.” Since breast tissue cells are shed during lactation, the cancer risk is decreased. She adds, “Because cells have potential DNA damage get shed before they can spark the cancer process.” Also, longer breastfeeding helps by reducing menstrual cycles and the lifetime exposure to hormones such as estrogen that can increase the risk of breast cancer.

Only 16% of US women exclusively breastfeed their babies for six months and 36% breastfeed exclusively for three months, so many American women are clearly missing the health benefits for themselves and their babies that exclusive breastfeeding has to offer. 47% of women in the U.S. breastfeed the first six months while also supplementing with formula.

Clearly the breast is best not only for your baby and for helping with your pregnancy weight loss, but also for your long-term health, reduced chance of cancer and overall longevity. That’s a powerful reason to breastfeed your baby!

Maternal America Charmuese Nursing Blouse

New this fall from Maternal America is the Charmuese Nursing Blouse is a silky in appearance with a beautifully printed orchid on a rust/orange color base. The black reverse cami under the orchid print blouse provides for discreet access. The nursing top is held together with a large black bow to provide more styling. Comes in a 3/4 sleeve for that cool fall weather.

Only $79 now at TummyStyle.com. Sizes range from XS to Large. This nursing top is so stylish that no one would every believe you could breastfeed in it!

National Breastfeeding Week in Ghana

National Breastfeeding Week was launched in Koforidu as a part of the campaign for exclusive breastfeeding in Ghana. The Theme is “Understanding the Past, Planning, the Future, Celebrating 10 years of the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding; Reviving Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative In Ghana.”

Research has shown that children who were not exclusively breastfed the first six months of life had increased risk of asthma, allergy, acute respiratory infections, nutrient deficiencies, cancers, obesity, and diarrhea and reduced cognitive development.

This campaign is also aiming at educating parents in the importance of not giving a baby water for the six months since in the past babies in this culture were traditionally given all types of drinks as infants including water, cod liver oil, gripe water and other liquids which is detrimental to their development and health.

The few mothers who attempt to practice exclusive breastfeeding in Ghana often find the social support system challenging as their mothers, grandmothers and in-laws and even pharmacy shops have sabotaged their efforts by encouraging them to supplement their babies with cod liver oil and gripe water to boost their babies’ systems.

Dr Iyabode Olusanmi, the country representative of UNICEF, who performed the launching, said the reduction in the exclusive breastfeeding meant that thousands of children had a lesser chance of surviving childhood just because they were not breast-fed early and exclusively, several children were being exposed to the risk of diarrhea and other infections and malnutrition and stunting growth would continue to plague children.

She called on the GHS to focus their attention on achieving the set goals for exclusive breastfeeding in the communities to reach mothers, fathers and husbands, older women, mothers-in-law and all those who played critical roles in influencing feeding practices in young families.

The World Breastfeeding Week campaign was launched globally about 20 years ago to raise awareness of the importance of exclusive breastfeeding in reducing infant mortality.

Jessica Simpson Struggles with Pregnancy Weight Loss

I have to confess I’m a secret Jessica Simpson fan. Although I often find it hard to embrace the personalities of most overly hyped and overpaid Hollywood stars; Jessica

Simpson, despite her billions, seems to bring humor and humanity to all that she does and says.

As the new spokesperson for Weight Watchers we expect this well looked after and richly compensated star to drop the weight in no time at all. I’m sure she has her own private chef preparing every morsel of food entering her mouth which of course conforms to her finally crafted personalized Weight Watcher’s diet plan. No doubt she also has personal trainers showing up at her doorstep 7 days a week and nannies to care for her baby at her beckon call. However, her latest comments on overindulging during pregnancy and her struggles with the pregnancy weight not coming off easily, sure hit home with me and made her all at once the relatable girlfriend next door.

The 32 year old singer, actress and designer who welcomed Maxwell Drew on May 1st admitted to USA Today her lack of knowledge regarding pregnancy pounds, “I didn’t realize it didn’t all come off with the baby.” The 5’4” Simpson’s own weight reportedly topped 170 pounds in March. Daughter Maxwell Drew weighed in 9 pounds, 13 ounces at birth.

“I let myself indulge in everything I wanted because it was the first time I was ever pregnant and I wanted to enjoy it. I wanted to be happy and eat what I wanted.”

“I’m not a supermodel,” she continued. “My body is not bouncing back like a supermodel. I’m just your everyday woman who is trying to feel good and be healthy for her daughter, her fiancé and herself.”

Although I’m sure Simpson will look svelte and fit in no time at all, it’s somewhat comforting to know that even the biggest celebrities can fight off those post pregnancy pounds like the rest of us commoners.

It’s also important to remember that nutrition comes first in addressing weight issues after pregnancy. Breastfeeding moms in particular need to make sure they consume adequate healthy calories so they can produce enough breast milk for their babies.

Study Shows Exercise For Nursing Mothers Is Not Harmful

The Journal of Pediatrics has reported from a study that mothers can regularily exercise without hindering their babies’s growth.

They also addressed the issue of breast feeding women having a change in their milk if they exercised. There has been some controversity by conflicting reports about whether excessive exercise would decrease immune-boosting protiens or make the breast milk impalatable if the lactic acids would get too high.

The study looked at several clinical trials that measured growth among breastfed babies with mothers who execised and show no sign of their babies’ wetigh gain slowing. In fact, there was statistically no difference in breastfed babies who mothers’ exercised when compared to breast fed babies whose mothers did not exercise.

Still, one should be sensible about their exercising after childbirth. Be sure to get a good bond with your child and have a really strong breastfeeding routine. You will also be more tired and worn out, and with the possibility of engourged breasts, you many not want to do anything too vigourous. Walking for 15 minutes a day may be a good way to start out.

Health experts reccomend that babies should be breastfed exclusively for their first six months and then slowly introducing solids to the baby’s diet. They also recommend to try to breastfeed for the first year.